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Russian Hill

Russian Hill is so-named for the 1800s discovery of Russian tombstones, thought to be the final resting place of fur traders from a Russian fort north of San Francisco. It is home to Lombard Street, "the crookedest street in the world," and in fact has several extremely picturesque staircase streets (parts of Vallejo and Green Streets, for example). The views extend from the Bay Bridge to the Golden Gate Bridge and Marin County. Alice Marble and Ina Coolbrith parks offer a serene spot to idle and enjoy the vistas. The Art Institute on Chestnut Street houses one of several controversial Diego Rivera murals in San Francisco. The Institute is in the Spanish Colonial style and dates back to 1926. The famed "Tales of the City" series by Armistead Maupin were inspired by Macondry Lane on Russian Hill. Area residences are some of the most interesting around and many offer amazing panoramas. Russian Hill is also home to many restaurants and great shopping opportunities.

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